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Chess Forum - kali-mera: play along with great masters (every Monday)

Player: Canada  dsuttlesChessHere Moderator Subject: kali-mera: play along with great masters (every Monday)


2014-07-28 05:53:41
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128Cyprus  kali-mera2014-10-14 04:53:40
Thank you my friend! This is an excellent additional comment!-

129Russian  kai20112014-10-15 09:51:29
*125
1.Rf7 ... 2.checkmate or Bxg6! La fin!
-

130Russian  kai20112014-10-16 01:42:52
By the way, Georgi! It\'s not the single solution!-

131Cyprus  kali-mera2014-10-20 03:09:20
The answer to our task:
--------------------------
1.Rxf7+!!


4rk2/1p3R2/p1b1p1p1/4P1Q1/3r4/3B4/Pq3PP1/3R2K1 b
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
HGFEDCBA



This task is from the game:
Svetozar Gligoric (1:0) Alexander Kazimirovich Tolush
URS-JUG (1957),after: 27...Rd4
(Note: 1.Rxf7+!!(in the task) = 28.Rxf7+!!(in the game))
Please enjoy this game (no more comments):

http://www.chesshere.com/pgnviewer/t.gif

Notes:
--------
- After: 32.Qf6+! the blacks resign!
- If: 32...Kg8 33.Bf7+! =(1:0)


4r1k1/1p3B2/p1b1pQ2/4P3/3r4/8/Pq3PP1/3R2K1 b
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
HGFEDCBA



--------------------------------
Good luck!

132Cyprus  kali-mera2014-10-20 03:35:47
The new lesson:
-------------------------
In this game the whites will move:
----------------------------------

rnbqkb1r/p2ppppp/1p6/2p1P3/8/2P2N2/PPP2PPP/R1BQKB1R w
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
ABCDEFGH


------------------------------------------
Now (the whites will move):
----------------------------
- First, check out this diagram.
- Try it yourself to answer (to decide) , but consistently.
- Then see what was the original solution to this problem.
---------------------------------------
And so now:
------------
If you are on the move with the whites pieces, what do you play now?
Good luck!
Note:
------
If you do not do this, then here down you can to look how the whites will win in this game!
-----------------------------------------
-

133Cyprus  kali-mera2014-10-20 03:59:18
This is the answer to our diagram:
-----------------------------------
1.e6! - with a very strong attack.


rnbqkb1r/p2ppppp/1p2P3/2p5/8/2P2N2/PPP2PPP/R1BQKB1R b
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
HGFEDCBA



This diagram is from the game:
Tigran Vartanovich Petrosian (1:0) Nikolay Dmitrievich Grigoriev
Tbilisi (1945), after: 5...b6?! = a dubious move.
(Note: 1.e6!(in the task) = 6.e6!(in the game))
Please enjoy this game (no more comments) with an instructional debut:

http://www.chesshere.com/pgnviewer/t.gif

Note:
-----
(The best is: 11...a6! for the blacks!)
--------------------------------------
Good luck! Georgi

134Cyprus  kali-mera2014-10-20 04:11:36
The new task:
-------------
Here the whites to move and win! How?


r4rk1/p1b1q1pp/3p1n2/1p1Pp3/2p5/7R/P3Q1PP/1BB2R1K w
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
ABCDEFGH



If you play with the whites how you proceed now? Here the whites have three pawns less, but they will to move and will win instantly in several moves! How?
Good luck!
----------------------------------------
My friends , I will expect your answers and your opinions for our new task in \'\'Play along with great masters!\'\' (every Monday) - our course(1). Good luck! Georgi
-----------------------------------------
-

135India  Pinku_raj2014-10-23 05:43:27
on which thme did i play along with great masters (every Monday). tel me the time-

136Cyprus  kali-mera2014-10-23 06:47:47
My friend Pinku_raj , your game and the play every one of this our forum that is conditional with the grandmasters! For example, our last task you play with grandmaster Svetozar Gligoric (with the whites) against Alexander Kazimirovich Tolush
(with the blacks). After you have played (conditional) your move - you will be able to compare it with to move and the play option on
the grandmaster. The goal is for you to evolution of their personality by playing with your suggestions and / or opinions on the game / task in this our forum! Good luck!
-

137India  Pinku_raj2014-10-24 18:51:31
hwy-

138India  Pinku_raj2014-10-24 19:08:16
XABCDEFGHY
8r+-+-+k+(
7zp-vl-wq-zpL\'
6-+-zp-tr-+&
5+p+Pzp-+-%
4-+p+-+-+$
3+-+-+-+R#
2P+-+Q+PzP\"
1+-vL-+-+K!
xabcdefghy
1.Rxf6 Rxf6 2.Bxh7+ Kf7 3.Bg5 Kf7 4.Qh5+ Kf8 5.Bxf6 Qxf6 6.Rf3 Bd8 7.Bg6 Ke7 8.Rxf6 gxf6 9.Qh7+ Kf8 10.Qf7#
-

139India  Pinku_raj2014-10-24 19:14:03
white- K h1 R (f1 h3) B(bc1) a2 d5 g2 h2
black – K g8 Qe7 Bc7 Nf6 a7 b5 c4 d6 e5 g7 h7 white to play

1.Rxf6 Rxf6 2.Bxh7+ Kf7 3.Bg5 Kf7 4.Qh5+ Kf8 5.Bxf6 Qxf6 6.Rf3 Bd8 7.Bg6 Ke7 8.Rxf6 gxf6 9.Qh7+ Kf8 10.Qf7#
-

140Cyprus  kali-mera2014-10-25 05:43:24
The answer to the task:
-------------------------
Congratulations Pinku_raj! Just so advanced my friend! Pinku_raj properly decided this task. Here is another Pinku_raj\'s analysis, which I read over here from our other forum (as an additional analysis):
-------------------------------------------
134India Pinku_raj 2014-10-24 21:24:37
W-Kh1 Qe2 Bb2 Bc1 Rf1 Rh3 a2 d5 g2 h2
B – Kf8 Qe7 Ra8 Rf8 Nf6 Bc7 a7 b5 c4 d6 e5 g7 h7 white to play
1.Rxf6 Rxf6 2.Bxh7+ Kf7
[2...Kf8
3.Bg5 Kf7
(3...e4 4.Rh5 Re8 5.Bxf6 gxf6+-)
4.Qh5+ Kf8 5.Bxf6 Qxf6 6.Rf3 Bd8 7.Bg6 Ke7 8.Rxf6 Kd7
(8...gxf6 9.Qh7+ Kf8 10.Qf7#)
9.Rf7+ Be7 10.Qh3+ Kc7 11.Rxe7+ Kb6 12.Qe3+ Ka6 13.Qa3+ Kb6 14.Qxd6+ Ka5 15.Re6 Ka4 16.Bc2+ Ka5 17.Qa3#]
3.Bg5 Rh8 4.Bxf6 gxf6 5.Bg6+ Kxg6
[5...Kg7 6.Rxh8 Kxh8
(6...Kxg6 2 7.Qg4+ Kf7 8.Qg8#)
7.Qh5+ Kg8=]
6.Qg4+ Kf7 7.Rxh8 Qf8 8.Rh7+ Qg7 9.Qxg7+ Ke8 10.Qe7# 1–0
--------------------------------------------
This task is from the game:
Simon Winawer (1:0) Hieronim Czarnowski
Paris (1867)
In this original game: 1.Rxf6!! = 30.Rxf6!!

r4rk1/p1b1q1pp/3p1R2/1p1Pp3/2p5/7R/P3Q1PP/1BB4K b
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
HGFEDCBA


and the blacks have moved: 30...Qxf6 ,
this option is not considered from our friend Pinku_raj - because the blacks quickly will lose their queen and then and the game. Please enjoy this game (no more comments) with an old version debut:

http://www.chesshere.com/pgnviewer/t.gif

---------------------------------

141Cyprus  kali-mera2014-10-25 05:52:45
Read more:
__________
The great master Szymon Abramowicz Winawer was born in Warsaw (Poland). He was German champion in 1883.

His first appearance internationally was at Paris 1867 where he finished 2nd= with Wilhelm Steinitz behind Ignatz Von Kolisch. For the next fifteen years he was among the World\'s best half dozen players. At Paris 1878 he was 1st= (+14, =5, -3) with Johannes Zukertort ahead of Joseph Henry Blackburne and George Henry Mackenzie, but took 2nd prize after the play-off. In 1881 at Berlin he was 3rd= with Mikhail Chigorin behind Blackburne and Zukertort. Then in the strongest tournament held up to that time he had his finest moment 1st= with Steinitz at Vienna 1882. The subsequent play-off was drawn (+1, -1). He fared badly at London 1883 and decided to give up chess but on his way back to Vienna he stopped off at Nuremberg in need of a dentist and was waylaid by the tournament organisers and was persuaded to play. The result was 1st prize ahead of Blackburne.

After a long absence he returned to chess in the 1890\'s but by that stage a younger generation was coming to the fore.

There are some openings named after him, viz the Winawer Attack in the Spanish Opening (Ruy Lopez); the Winawer Counter-Gambit in the Queen\'s Gambit Declined which Winawer played against Frank James Marshall at Monte Carlo (1901) and of course the Winawer variation of the French Defence. He passed away in Warsaw in 1919.
--------------------------------------
Here are another 2 more games (2 wins) of
the great master Winawer(for your pleasure):
Simon Winawer (1:0) Mikhail Chigorin
St. Petersburg (Russia) (1875)

http://www.chesshere.com/pgnviewer/t.gif

-----------------------------------------

142Cyprus  kali-mera2014-10-25 05:57:11
Read more:
__________
and:
------
Wilhelm Steinitz (0:1) Simon Winawer
Vienna (1882)

http://www.chesshere.com/pgnviewer/t.gif

-----------------------------------------
Good luck! Georgi

143Cyprus  kali-mera2014-10-25 05:59:29
My friends , I will expect your answers and your opinions for our new task in \'\'Play along with great masters!\'\' (every Monday) - our course(1).
-----------------------------------------
Good luck! Georgi
-

144Cyprus  kali-mera2014-10-27 10:36:07
The new lesson:
-------------------------
In this game the blacks will move:
----------------------------------

4r1k1/pp3p2/2p1rn2/3pB1p1/P2P2P1/1P1Q4/2P2qBP/5R1K b
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
HGFEDCBA


------------------------------------------
Now (the blacks will move):
----------------------------
- First, check out this diagram.
- Try it yourself to answer (to decide) , but consistently.
- Then see what was the original solution to this problem.
---------------------------------------
And so now:
------------
If you are on the move with the blacks pieces, what do you play now?
Good luck!
Note:
------
If you do not do this, then here down you can to look how the blacks will win in this game!
-----------------------------------------
-

145Cyprus  kali-mera2014-10-27 10:48:35
This is the answer to our diagram:
-----------------------------------
1...Nxg4! - with a very strong attack.

4r1k1/pp3p2/2p1r3/3pB1p1/P2P2n1[/1P1Q4/2P2qBP/5R1K w
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
ABCDEFGH


And if: 2.Bh3

4r1k1/pp3p2/2p1r3/3pB1p1/P2P2n1/1P1Q3B/2P2q1P/5R1K b
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
HGFEDCBA


------------------------------------------
Now (the blacks will move) this is our Diagram (2):
------------------------------------------
- First, check out this Diagram (2).
- Try it yourself to answer (to decide) , but consistently.
- Then see what was the original solution to this problem.
---------------------------------------
And so now:
------------
If you are on the move with the blacks pieces, what do you play now?
Good luck!
Note:
------
If you do not do this, then here down you can to look how the blacks will win in this game!
-----------------------------------------
-

146Cyprus  kali-mera2014-10-27 11:27:05
This is the answer to our Diagram (2):
---------------------------------------
1...(2...)Rxe5!!

4r1k1/pp3p2/2p5/3pr1p1/P2P2n1/1P1Q3B/2P2q1P/5R1K w
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
ABCDEFGH


This Diagram (2) is from the game:
Mikhail Chigorin (0:1) Simon Winawer
London (1883) , after: 27.Bh3:
(Note: Here 1...(2...)Rxe5!!(in the Diagram (2)) = 27...Rxe5!!(in the original game).)
Please enjoy this game (no more comments) with an interesting debut:

http://www.chesshere.com/pgnviewer/t.gif

----------------------------------------
Good luck! Georgi

147Cyprus  kali-mera2014-10-27 11:45:11
The new task:
-------------
Here the whites to move and win! How?


r2qr2k/ppp3p1/3p3p/3Bn1P1/5Q2/2B5/PPP2PP1/2K4R w
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
ABCDEFGH



If you play with the whites how you proceed now? Here the whites have a rook less for a bishop, but they will to move and will win instantly only in one move! How?
Good luck!
----------------------------------------
My friends , I will expect your answers and your opinions for our new task in \'\'Play along with great masters!\'\' (every Monday) - our course(1). Good luck! Georgi
-----------------------------------------
-

148Cyprus  kali-mera2014-11-03 04:31:35
The answer to the task:
-------------------------
1.g6!!

r2qr2k/ppp3p1/3p2Pp/3Bn3/5Q2/2B5/PPP2PP1/2K4R b
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
HGFEDCBA


2.Rxh6+! - scares and the blacks no salvation from the mate!
If: 1...Nxg6 2.Qxh6x

r2qr2k/ppp3p1/3p2nQ/3B4/8/2B5/PPP2PP1/2K4R b
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
HGFEDCBA


This task is from the game:
Simon Winawer (1:0) Wilhelm Steinitz
Nuremberg (1896),but in the game: 1.g6!! = 20.g6!!
(after: 20.g6!! and the blacks resign!)
Note:
-----
And: 1.Qg3! - also is a strong move and the whites will win, but 1.g6!! is the strongest!
Please enjoy this game (no more comments) with an old version debut:

http://www.chesshere.com/pgnviewer/t.gif

----------------------------------------
Good luck! Georgi

149Cyprus  kali-mera2014-11-03 04:50:22
The new lesson:
-------------------------
In this game the whites will move (they have one pawn less):
----------------------------------

2rr4/p1q2k2/4npbR/1ppBpNp1/3nP1P1/5P2/P1PB2K1/3RQ3 w
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
ABCDEFGH


---------------------------------
Now (the whites will move)in this diagram.
------------------------------------------
- First, check out this Diagram.
- Try it yourself to answer (to decide) , but consistently.
- Then see what was the original solution to this problem.
---------------------------------------
And so now:
------------
If you are on the move with the whites pieces, what do you play now?
Good luck!
Note:
------
If you do not do this, then here down you can to look how the whites will move and how they will win in this game!
-----------------------------------------
Good luck!
-

150Cyprus  kali-mera2014-11-04 02:45:02
This is the answer to our Diagram:
----------------------------------
1.Ba5! - of course!

2rr4/p1q2k2/4npbR/BppBpNp1/3nP1P1/5P2/P1P3K1/3RQ3 b
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
HGFEDCBA


If: 1...Nxc2 (The best!) 2.Bxe6+!

2rr4/p1q2k2/4BpbR/Bpp1pNp1/4P1P1/5P2/P1n3K1/3RQ3 b
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
HGFEDCBA


2...Kxe6 3.Qc3!

2rr4/p1q5/4kpbR/Bpp1pNp1/4P1P1/2Q2P2/P1n3K1/3R4 b
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
HGFEDCBA


and if: 3...b4 4.Qc4+! etc = (1:0)

2rr4/p1q5/4kpbR/B1p1pNp1/1pQ1P1P1/5P2/P1n3K1/3R4 b
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
HGFEDCBA


or if: 3...Qc6 4.Rxd8! etc = (1:0)

2rR4/p7/2q1kpbR/Bpp1pNp1/4P1P1/2Q2P2/P1n3K1/8 b
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
HGFEDCBA


or if: 3...Rxd1 4.Bxc7

2r5/p1B5/4kpbR/1pp1pNp1/4P1P1/2Q2P2/P1n3K1/3r4 b
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
HGFEDCBA


4...Kf7 5.Qxc2

2r5/p1B2k2/5pbR/1pp1pNp1/4P1P1/5P2/P1Q3K1/3r4 b
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
HGFEDCBA


5...Rd7 6.Nd6+!

2r5/p1Br1k2/3N1pbR/1pp1p1p1/4P1P1/5P2/P1Q3K1/8 b
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
HGFEDCBA


6...Kg7 7.Rxg6+!

2r5/p1Br2k1/3N1pR1/1pp1p1p1/4P1P1/5P2/P1Q3K1/8 b
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
HGFEDCBA


7...Kxg6 8.Nxc8

2N5/p1Br4/5pk1/1pp1p1p1/4P1P1/5P2/P1Q3K1/8 b
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
HGFEDCBA


8...Rxc7 9.Nd6 etc = (1:0)

8/p1r5/3N1pk1/1pp1p1p1/4P1P1/5P2/P1Q3K1/8 b
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
HGFEDCBA


------------------------------------------
Of course and after: 2.Qh1! (instead of: 2.Bxe6+!) the whites also will win!

2rr4/p1q2k2/4npbR/BppBpNp1/4P1P1/5P2/P1n3K1/3R3Q b
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
HGFEDCBA


This is from the game:
Dmitry Andreikin (1:0) Sergey Karjakin
FIDE Grand Prix Tashkent (2014)
(Here: 2.Qh1! = 33.Qh1!)
Please enjoy this game (no more comments):

http://www.chesshere.com/pgnviewer/t.gif

Note:
-----
After: 34.Rh7+! and the blacks resign!
----------------------------------------
Good luck! Georgi

151Cyprus  kali-mera2014-11-04 03:04:28
Read more:
__________
And after: 1.(32.)Ba5! Nxc2 2.(33.)Qh1! Rxd5
(instead of: 2...(33...)Qa5) the whites also will win with: 3.(34.)Bxc7 etc = (1:0)!

2r5/p1B2k2/4npbR/1pprpNp1/4P1P1/5P2/P1n3K1/3R3Q b
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
HGFEDCBA


Please enjoy and this game (no more comments):

http://www.chesshere.com/pgnviewer/t.gif

------------------------------------------
Good luck! Georgi

152Cyprus  kali-mera2014-11-04 03:40:32
The new task:
-------------
No! No a new task!
------------------
For now here do not will be a new task because from Friday (Nov 7) will start the great match for the World Championship between Carlsen and Anand in Sochi , Russia, and here on this forum (on this site) I will do only my best to comment on it! Good luck! Georgi
-

153Cyprus  kali-mera2014-11-08 03:50:23
FIDE World Chess Championship 2014:
-------------------------------------------
The Championship Match
Sochi 2014 - from today (08/11/2014)

The Match is a culmination of the two-year FIDE cycle and is played every two years between the incumbent Champion and the winner of the Candidates tournament. The Match is played over a maximum of twelve games and the winner of the match shall be the first player to score 6.5 points or more. If the scores are level after 12 games, 4 tie-break are played.
Or:
----
http://www.sochi2014.fide.com/

Rating from: 08 November 2014, 07:58 GMT
-------------------------------------------
http://www.2700chess.com/

FIDE World Chess Championship 2013:
-------------------------------------------
FINAL SCORE: Carlsen 6½; Anand 3½
Anand (+0 =7 -3) Carlsen (2013):
http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chess.pl?tid=81142&crosstable=1
or:
---
http://chennai2013.fide.com/fide-world-chess-championship-2013-live/
or:
---
http://www.chessdom.com/world-chess-championship-2013-live/

LIFETIME RECORD:
Classical games: Magnus Carlsen tied Viswanathan Anand 6 to 6, with 28 draws.
Including rapid/exhibition games: Viswanathan Anand beat Magnus Carlsen 16 to 15, with 46 draws.
Only rapid/exhibition games: Viswanathan Anand beat Magnus Carlsen 10 to 9, with 18 draws.
http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chess.pl?page=1&pid=52948&pid2=12088

World Chess Championship Candidates Tournament (2014):
-------------------------------------
Viswanathan Anand 8.5/14(+3 -0 =11)
Sergey Karjakin 7.5/14(+3 -2 =9 )
Shakhriyar Mamedyarov 7.0/14(+3 -3 =8 )
Vladimir Kramnik 7.0/14(+3 -3 =8 )
Dmitry Andreikin 7.0/14(+2 -2 =10)
Peter Svidler 6.5/14(+3 -4 =7 )
Levon Aronian 6.5/14(+3 -4 =7 )
Veselin Topalov 6.0/14(+2 -4 =8 )
or:
---
http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chess.pl?tid=83141&crosstable=1

Magnus Carlsen
(Norway)

Incumbent World Chess Champion (Since 2013) is one of the youngest ever to become a Grandmaster. Dubbed \'The Mozart of Chess\' by the fans and media alike, he is known for his amazing chess skills in the endgame. It\'s the first time he is defending his title.

Viswanathan Anand
(India)

5-time World Chess Champion, Vishy Anand is considered one of the most versatile chess players in the world. He is the only world champion who won titles playing in all different formats (match, tournament and knockout). He is the first Indian grandmaster.

Specially chosen for today:
-----------------------------
Magnus Carlsen (0:1) Viswanathan Anand
\"Something Vishy This Way Comes\" (game of the day Jun-24-14)
FIDE World Rapid Championship (2014)

http://www.chesshere.com/pgnviewer/t.gif

Here is one of the places where you can watch this match live with the comments for you from the computers: Houdini , Komodo and Stockfish:
http://www.chessdom.com/carlsen-anand-2014-live-games/
-------------------------------------
Expect and my comment in the day after each game! Good luck! Georgi

154Cyprus  kali-mera2014-11-09 02:04:15
FIDE World Chess Championship 2014:
-------------------------------------------
Viswanathan Anand (1/2 : 1/2) Magnus Carlsen
Game (1) - (08/11/2014)
Here is one of the places where you can watch this Game (1) in this match with the comment for you from the computer:
Houdini 4 Pro x64:

http://live.fide.com/sochi/replay.php?round=31&name=1
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Please enjoy this game:
-----------------------

http://www.chesshere.com/pgnviewer/t.gif

1.d4
GM Bauer: Hello dear chess friends and welcome to the Carlsen - Anand World Chess Championship match live games! I am GM Christian Bauer (ELO 2646) and will be covering for you the game with commentary. Follow the game with me as the action happens, and for more detailed books and material visit Olibris or Chess Insider pdf magazine.
1...Nf6
GM Bauer: Last year the 2 first games of the match had been short and rather uneventful draws. Anand had been criticised afterwards for not having continued game 1 as Black which was roughly equal. Today he has white, let\'s see how he will proceed
2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 d5
GM Bauer: So we have a Grunfeld opening on the board! Not the most likely choice for Carlsen as black
4.cxd5 Nxd5 5.Bd2 Bg7 6.e4
GM Bauer: So far standard theory. Anand\'s response 5.d2 was a bit modest.
6...Nxc3 7.Bxc3 O-O 8.Qd2 Nc6
GM Bauer: This seems a bit odd from Carlsen as usually Black\'s counterplay is rather linked with the ...c7-c5 push. There is a recent game Moiseenko - Nepomniachtchi where B continued with the logical 9...Bg4. Nepomniachtchi is one of Carlsen\'s second, no doubt the Wolrd Champion is aware of this rapid game. Will there be novelties?
9.Nf3
GM Bauer: ...Bg4 now for Carlsen will increases the pressure on the d4 pawn, as well as he develop a piece. A solid move in opening theory. Explore more opening choices for black with GM Avrukh here
9....Bg4
GM Bauer: Now White would have to make up his mind between several options in order to protect d4. The worst one seems to be e4-e5, for positional reasons, it looks risky, while after 10.Rd1 B may continue ...e7-e5. This leaves 10.d4-d5, a move that has indeed been played 3 times so far at high level.
10.d5 Bxf3 11.Bxg7 Kxg7 12.gxf3 Ne5 13.O-O-O
GM Bauer: Vishy plays fast, he is prepared! He is close to 30 mins ore on the clock. I am not sure if after ...Ne5 white is as well as in the preceding games that we mentioned, but still it is a good position for white. The move 13. O-O-O is the new move, instead of the more timid 13.Be2. A straightforward plan for Vishy is now to push h2-h4 (h5). In my opinion this choice is the right approach from Anand. Even though some pieces have been exchanged, he keeps attacking chances and has avoided a sedated game, his main problem last year. As conclusion from the opening, a good start by Anand! How do you see the game so far? Make your predictions here
13...c6
GM Bauer: quite a committal move, especially since 14. Qc3 is an option here, when the Rd1 and the Qd8 will be placed in a vis-a-vis. No wonder Carlsen pondered for a while before playing it. So let\'s assume 14.Qc3 f6 15.dxc6, or 15.f4 first. Anand can obviously grab a pawn here, and thus he is planning how to do it. However, this means opening lines on the queenside too, where his king won\'t be that safe. That is why he is taking his time thinking.
14.Qc3
GM Bauer: Anand decided on the most obvious move, exactly the one we expected ; now ...f7-f6 is forced. The problem with Qc3 is that Black will have ...Rc8 as a subsequent threat, once the \"c\" file will be opened
14...f6 15.Bh3
GM Bauer: Bh3 from Anand makes sense, of course, to deny Black the annoying option ...Rc8. The negative spot is that White doesn\'t cash in a pawn yet. Now 15...cxd5 or perhaps something like 15...Qb6 come to mind
15...cxd5
GM Bauer: White can take back on d5 with his e- pawn after including f3-f4 Nf7. The reason being he can generate pressure vs the black e-pawn which would compensate for his bad pawn-structure as d5, f2,f4 and h2 becoming all isolated pawns. This matter of fact implies that Anand has to look for dynamic measures in order to compensate for the static inferiority of his position.
16.exd5
GM Bauer: Many moves to consider here. What can be the plans? Looking far ahead, without queens on the board, Black could consider the positional move ...g6-g5 in order to secure his well-placed knight vs the advance f3-f4. But under the game\'s circumstances it is quite likely that his king wouldn\'t be too happy with that positional decision .
16...Nf7
GM Bauer: a prophylactic move by Magnus ; the knight is heading the blockading square d6
17.f4
GM Bauer: f3-f4, ruling out an eventual ...Ng5. Now ...Qb6 seems quite adequate, it asks White the question about his f2 pawn. While after ...Nd6 putting a rook at c8 will be a threat. Black has to be rather quick, since if White were to succeed in playing his Bishop to e6 and then pushing his h-pawn, things could become quite dangerous for Black. If 17...Qd6 comes 18.Qd4 the right square for the white Queen since it both covers f4 and keeps the pin on the f6-pawn. Black has to find an antidote to Rhe1-e6 now.
17...Qd6 18.Qd4 Rad8
GM Bauer: This could very well be slight inaccuracy by Carlsen. Rad8 from Magnus is destined to get rid of the backward \"e\" pawn. The obvioul idea is ...e7-e5 when White can\'t take en passant. That said, beside the best move 19.Be6 here which prevents the aforementioned idea, the consequences of 19.Rhe1 e5 20.fxe5 are not that clear to me.
19.Be6 Qb6
GM Bauer: now the logical follow-up is to take that queen and try to use the c-file, so something like 21.Qxb6 axb6 22.Kc1, next Rc1. Then perhaps Black can hold with 22...Rd6 23.Rc1 Rb8 24.Rc7 Kf8 though in this case 25.Bxf7 Kxf7 26.Re1 looks pretty annoying
20.Qd2
GM Bauer: Vishy again plays fast. In this ending time plays an important role, but if Black is given 1 or 2 tempo/tempi he will consolidate and might even get the better of it in the long-run. Anand decided not to trade queens, White still has attacking prospects f4-f5, h2-h4 etc plus to throw in the 2nd f-pawn
20...Rd6
GM Bauer: After this knight move to d8, Black simply wants to trade pieces. Anand has to decide between f4-f5 and moving his Bishop, which allows simplifications after ...e7-e6, then the endgame after a mass exchange on e6 followed by Qd7+ Qxd7 Rxd7 Rf7 is drawish, but White remains with an inferior pawn-structure
21.Rhe1
GM Bauer: It is a time to reconsider GM Sergey Shipov\'s words analyzing the match for New in Chess. How much of a role psychology plays in this game?
21...Nd8 22.f5 Nxe6 23.Rxe6 Qc7+ 24.Kb1
GM Bauer: After Kb1 Carlsen can take the h2 pawn if he wants, but then, after Rxe6 dxe6 Qxh2. There would follow the nasty Qd7
24...Rc8
GM Bauer: Black is threatening ...Rxd5 when Qxd5 runs into Qc2+ Ka1 Qc1+, so a \"luftloch\", a2-a3, could prove quite useful here
25.Rde1
GM Bauer: I like Anand\'s 25.Rde1 even though the computer now sees Black better if he takes 26...gxf5. I don\'t believe White can experience serious troubles there
25...Rxe6 26.Rxe6 Rd8
GM Bauer: a bit strange a decision, but d5-d6 was a concern
27.Qe3
GM Bauer: 27.Qe3 was the best move ; now ...Kf7 runs into 28.Qh6. On the other hand 27...Rd7 is a bit passive, then 28.fxg6 hxg6 29.h4
27...Rd7 28.d6 exd6 29.Qd4 Rf7 30.fxg6
GM Bauer: in view of the reduced material Anand shouldn\'t manage to generate serious threats. Despite having a position that looks better, I doubt there will be a winner today
30...hxg6 31.Rxd6 a6 32.a3 Qa5
GM Bauer: now, after 32...Qa5, Black may want to offer a trade of Queens by means of ...Qe5. Then after Qxe5 fxe5 Re6 Rxf2 Rxe5 he could take h2 in return for b7. But it is White\'s move, and f4 or h4 makes sense here
33.f4 Qh5
GM Bauer: h2 is under attack, but if White plays for instance 34.Ka2 Qxh2 35.Rd7. I guess he will find a perpetual check, unless 35...Qh3 is strong planning to meet 36.Rxf7+ Kxf7 37.Qd5 by ...Qe6 -+, therefore 34.Qd2
34.Qd2
GM Bauer: Black has got a better pawn structure, but with his king being a bit open. He would have to watch for perpetual check if the Rooks happen to be exchanged
34...Qc5 35.Rd5 Qc4
GM Bauer: White doesn\'t have much constructive work to do, but a \"pass move\" is fine
36.Rd7 Qc6 37.Rd6 Qe4+ 38.Ka2
GM Bauer: a tad more pleasant for Black and the position has become what Carlsen is quite good at. On the other hand, it is hard to imagine Anand could go completely wrong here.
38...Re7 39.Qc1 a5 40.Qf1
GM Bauer: Vishy obviously isn\'t comfortable in defending this position. From a psychological point of view Anand\'s pos looked nice, after the opening, even if nothing concrete was to be found.
40...a4
GM Bauer: Engines suggest 41.Rd1 is best, a move that isn\'t easy to find. True, the 2nd best move suffices to stay afloat for the moment.
41.Rd1
GM Bauer: After a good think, Vishy found the move. Now ...Qf5, threatening ...Re4 seems logical, but it also allows Qc4 with a gain of activity for the white Queen, thus it is not obvious how to reinforce Black\'s position
41...Qc2
GM Bauer: now either 42.Rd4 or Qf3 has to be found. Very interesting retrospective, when you look at the graph of the engines (graph button) on the right: the game proves to be one of the most interesting Anand - Carlsen encounters
42.Rd4 Re2
GM Bauer: The move ...Re3 was more effective and dangerous for Magnus, but he probably feels Vishy can counter it and looks for an alternative.
43.Rb4 b5 44.Qh1
GM Bauer: And now Vishy is confident again. He plays the move fast, after 43...b5 he seems to have found the algorithm for securing the draw
44...Re7 45.Qd5 Re1 46.Qd7+ Kh6 47.Qh3+ Kg7
GM Bauer: And this will be a draw. What a draw! A lot of star moves from both sides until the final defense found by Vishy Qh1 which put the cherry on the pie! Beautiful start of the World Chess Championship and a lot more to come in the next games. Thank you for following with me GM Christian Bauer, see you for more details in the Chess Insider pdf magazine and tomorrow\'s live commentary.
48.Qd7+ (1/2-1/2)
My comment:
-----------
No good: 48...Kf8 49.Qd8+ Kf7 50.Qd7+ Re7?!
51.Qxb5 Re1 etc = Draw , again with perpetual check from the whites!
--------------------------------------
Good luck!
Note:
-----
Today (12:00 pm. GMT) starts the second game!
Here is one of the places where you can watch this match live with the comments for you from the computers: Houdini , Komodo and Stockfish:
http://www.chessdom.com/carlsen-anand-2014-live-games/
Or from the computer: Houdini 4 Pro x64:
http://live.fide.com/sochi/index.php

155England  cc1422628553ChessHere Moderator2014-11-09 02:55:28
Two of the main talking points of this game were raised by GM Svidler, a Grunfield expert.
1. Anand playing 9.Nf3. Rarely played as it allowed 9...Bg4. BxN would wreck the kings defense.Carlsen took almost 30min to reply 9...Bg4 making sure he hadn`t overlooked something. And sure enough BxN happened.
More normal at this level was 9.d5.
2. 43..Re7? 43..Rg2 was better. This mistake leveled the computer analysis from a +1 to Carlsen and allowed Anand an easier draw.
-

156Cyprus  kali-mera2014-11-10 06:16:34
FIDE World Chess Championship (2014) match Carlsen - Anand
------------------------------------------
Magnus Carlsen (1:0) Viswanathan Anand
Game (2) - (09/11/2014)
Here is one of the places where you can watch this Game (1) in this match with the comment for you from the computer:
Houdini 4 Pro x64:
http://live.fide.com/sochi/replay.php?round=32&name=1
------------------------------------------
Please enjoy this game:
-----------------------

http://www.chesshere.com/pgnviewer/t.gif

1.e4 (The roles are reversed!
Anand generally likes more:1.e4,
while Carlsen - 1.d4.)
GM: Hello dear chess friends and welcome to the Carlsen - Anand World Chess Championship match live games. Follow the game with us as the action happens, and for more detailed material visit Chess Insider pdf magazine. Yesterday the game was swinging from plus to minus on evaluation, proving to be one of the most exciting draws from World Championships. Today is Carlsen\'s first game with white. His openings are unpredictable, just as this first move that we just saw. Still in time to make your predictions here
1...e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5
GM: Ruy Lopez opening also known as Spanish game
3....Nf6 4.d3
GM: So, quite a surprise, Anand is using the Berlin defense vs one of the best connoisseur of the system.... and as usual Carlsen declines the ending, but instead goes for 4.d3
4...Bc5 5.O-O d6
GM: On move 5 Anand could have tried ...Nd4, something that he has played before in rapid, in order to simplify by trading off one pair of pieces. The move ...d6 is also an option, although mostly appears in blitz (many casual players use it on Chess Arena online platform)
6.Re1 O-O 7.Bxc6
GM: Bxc6 is a bit strange, as usually White waits for his opponent to invite the exchange, by ...a7-a6. White gets a better pawn-structure in return for the 2 bishops
7...bxc6 8.h3
GM: a sensible plan for Black is to try to prepare and push ...f7-f5, opening the position for his Bishops
8...Re8
GM: Very interesting to note today\'s game is similar to Carlsen - Grischuk, from Candidates last year when Carlsen chose c3 instead of Re1. The teams certainly have made improvement, a theoretical battle ahead. Grischuk himself is now playing Petrosian Memorial, round 5 is live here now
9.Nbd2
GM: This is the start of the theoretical battle, something that Vishy and Magnus are developing and writing the new pages in chess history. See the opening theory until this point at ChessOpenings24 analysis
9...Nd7
GM: A logical plan for Magnus Carlsen is to try pushing c2-c3 next d3-d4
10.Nc4 Bb6
GM: A multi level move that changes the character of the game. An interesting choice! At first sight it prevents Na5, while opening an option to move ...c5. It also frees the square c4 for the knight, which effectively fights against a d3-d4 break from Carlsen. Now a2-a4 could pose some problems from black, whereas d3-d4 is less testing. Of course a much softer option of a2-a4 is Bd2 claiming a weakness, Carlsen will take some time on this move.
11.a4
GM: Carlsen is direct, and now Vishy\'s choice will be a5 right away. Other options to be checked are ...a6, d5 and f6.
11...a5
GM: if now d3-d4, then ...Ba6 seems quite ok. It will support the diagonal for the game.
12.Nxb6
GM: As a result, Carlsen decided to get rid of Vishy\'s bishop and simplify the position. Was it the best choice in the position? Probably not, but Carlsen looked for stability after which he will be looking for a \"d4\" move.
12...cxb6 13.d4
GM: Now Anand can be persistent and put another bishop in control with Bd7. We have to note that exd4 is not bad at all too. Other moves on the list are ...g6 or ...Qc7.
13...Qc7 14.Ra3
GM: Magnus is again direct. He wants to put the rook on d3 and play dxe5 at the appropriate moment. Vishy has to be still careful. The evaluation of the position stays the same, the character changes once again. Now, if Black prevents the rook lift to d3 by ...Ba6, then Nh4-f5 + Rg3 + Bh6 etc. means serious attacking chances for White on the kingside.
14...Nf8
GM: The best move, again up to Magnus to find some spice in the position and try creating problems. It is a time to reconsider GM Sergey Shipov\'s words analyzing the match for New in Chess. How much of a role psychology plays in this game?
15.dxe5 dxe5 16.Nh4 Rd8
GM: Qh5 and Qe2 are the natural moves, because a Qf3 would block the rook and this is not something Magnus took the rook out for.
17.Qh5 f6
GM: A totally equal, but very dynamic position. A lot of moves are possible in the position, with no time trouble looming it is time for a good think and planning.
18.Nf5
GM: Carlsen gives Anand trading chances instead of piling pressure. But there are even better options for Black like ...Be6, opening more squares for it, or Ng6 (not Ne6) looking for knight activity.
18...Be6
GM: Vishy is flawless so far, countering precisely every white plan. ...Qf7 seemed fine too, but Anand correctly judged that the white attack isn\'t too dangerous yet. Indeed, Black can at any moment take ...Bxf5, while on the immediate Rg3 just ...Ng6 holds
19.Rg3
GM: At some point white can try Bh6 then, when after ...gxh6 Rxg6+ hxg6 Qxg6+ Kf8 Qxf6+ Qf7 I don\'t think white has more than a perpetual check
19...Ng6
GM: Now 20.Bh6, but then maybe just 20...Rd7. Engines like 20.h4, but Black can just play ...Kh8, take on f5 and then remove his Ng6 if h5 comes
20.h4
GM: ...Rd7 is the move for Anand again in view of Bh6. Another possibility is to take the knight, it requires initial preparation with Qc8 in its optimal form, a move more difficult to find over the board. To finish the idea presented in the last move 20.h4 Kh8 and if 21.Rxg6 , then 21... Qf7.
20...Bxf5
GM: Without the ...Qc8 support, the take is not optimal. 21. exf5 Nf4 22. Bxf4 exf4 and Rc3. Curiously, we are falling in a position similar to yesterday, with the heavy pieces on the board and slight advantage for Magnus.
21.exf5 Nf4 22.Bxf4 exf4 23.Rc3
GM: As we expected, and now the natural ...c5 and Re6 or Qf3 are coming. With this time on the clock, 35 min vs 47 min, + f4 pawn weak and a more vulnerable king, things are not easy for Anand.
23...c5 24.Re6
GM: The best defensive skills of Anand are required: ...h6 or Rab8 now
24...Rab8 25.Rc4
GM: the point is not a direct attack on f4, rather the threat of attacking with Re7. Now we see the nuances of having ...Qc8 prepared before the knight take. Qd7 is now needed, but Vishy\'s position is deteriorating. Black cannot do anything active, Rce4 next Re8+ or Re7 is very dangerous.
25...Qd7
GM: Anand is threatening to exchange queens. This would be a dream come true for him, Carlsen will not allow it running to Kh2.
26.Kh2 Rf8
GM: Was ...Re8 (26...Re8 27.Rce4 Rxe6) the only chance to keep the position? Now the \"e\" file will be conquered with Rce4 and freeing the queen with Qf3. No useful moves for black and no counterplay
27.Rce4 Rb7 28.Qe2
GM: As we said, Qf3 was more precise, Qe2 though is strong enough. With useless moves at hand, Anand may try ...h6 or even ...b5 getting some air and positional space.
28...b5
GM: If 29.Re7 then Qd6 is a nice try, but after the simple 30.f3 Anand would be in trouble. Vishy may be lost objectively, but I don\'t see any immediate win for Carlsen.
29.b3
GM: A chance for Anand to play f3 now to open the diagonal, the pawn is lost anyhow.
29...bxa4 30.bxa4 Rb4
GM: Several options here: 31.Re7 (31...Rxe4 is not good in view of 32.Qxe4 Qc8 33.Ra7 +-) Qd6 32.Qf3 is very strong. A beautiful tactic is 31.Re7 followed by Qxf5 is a decisive mistake in view of 32.Rxb4 cxb4 33.Qc4+ Kh8 34.Qf7!! Also on the list is 31. c4 move
31.Re7 Qd6 32.Qf3 Rxe4 33.Qxe4 f3+ 34.g3 h5? (What a big mistake !?)
GM: And just as Vishy started recovering a blunder comes. There is no way to defend the 7th rank. After Qd2 Anand would have had counterplay connected to the c pawn. Game over and Carlsen takes the lead in the match, after converting his first game with white.
Now: 35.Qb7! (1:0)
-----------------------------------------
To be continued!

157Cyprus  kali-mera2014-11-10 06:37:05
Read more:
__________

Instead of: 34...h5? now must: 34...Qd2!

5rk1/4R1pp/5p2/p1p2P2/P3Q2P/5pP1/2Pq1P1K/8 w
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
ABCDEFGH


And after: 35.Qxf3! Qxc2!

5rk1/4R1pp/5p2/p1p2P2/P6P/5QP1/2q2P1K/8 w
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
ABCDEFGH


and the blacks retain all chances to make a draw! For an example - please enjoy this game:

http://www.chesshere.com/pgnviewer/t.gif

Those of you who follow: AAA in our other forum - they knew that this is 100% a draw!
-------------------------------------------
To be continued!

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